Julianne

DiBlasi

Black

What is the story behind the Kingdom of Cool?

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Please help get the Kingdom of cool up and running giving little girls with glasses a new set of princess role models they can identify with!

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So I’m in the kitchen making dinner when my daughter announces she needs to “get dressed”. At 4 years old, that either means a superhero cape and mask or a princess dress. Or both.


Tonight was the dress, but she came out of the bedroom holding her glasses instead of wearing them. The glasses are a new thing in our house, it has been less than two months since the pediatrician noticed a anomaly in her eye scan, and the whole eye doctor/glasses thing has been quite the adventure.


So naturally, I was concerned, and asked why she wasn’t wearing them.

Her answer broke my heart.


She straightened up and announced “Princesses do not wear glasses.”


[Mental expletive string causing mild brain malfunction].

I got it together and my husband and I began our counter argument, but it was too late. She then backs up her claim with a tear-jerker 


“I went through all of my princess books and not one of them wears glasses.”


NOT ANYMORE!

Because of this experience and the resulting research, I decided to make my own.
And The Kingdom of Cool is born.

Princesses DO wear glasses, they also like science, ride dinosaurs, are interested in space and do much more than dress up for tea parties. These are the princesses I want my daughter to look up to - how about you?

By creating several princesses and promoting them enough that they become accessible, they become normalized, even expected. Its about variation, because nothing says there is something wrong with you more than a toy store full of perfect blond-hair, blue-eyed dolls in tiaras that don't look anything like you. 

I'm not only giving them hobbies, careers and interests, but I'm careful to use unusual skin/hair color combos. This makes them ALL accessible and identifiable. 


My goals are simple:


  • To provide an alternative to the cookie-cutter norm
  • To inspire all the little girls that are into princesses to look further than the dress and the bling
  • To make each princess interesting and engaging
  • To create characters that are identifiable through interest rather than physical attributes
  • To blast open the idea that being a princess means behaving a "certain" way
  • To provide girls an "imagination bridge" that gives them permission to create their own characters



I hope you will join me in taking the unifying trend of loving princess stuff to the next level. 

I mean really, how many fancy dances and tea parties can one girl have before they wonder what more there is to life?